Archive for the ‘Interviews’ Category

Michelle Nijhuis’s National Geographic Adventure Began with a Single Word

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In her first assignment from National Geographic, award-winning freelance science journalist Michelle Nijhuis started with a one-word assignment: coal. Based on that single word, Nijhuis traveled  from West Virginia, a top coal state, to China, the world’s largest coal user. No spoilers here, so we’ll just say that a long lag between assignment and publication […]

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Jon Mooallem uncovers a wild plan to bring hippopotamus ranching to America

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Jon Mooallem is fascinated by the relationships between humans and other animals, a topic he explores in his 2013 book Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America. Mooallem is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, and a frequent contributor to other magazines […]

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Deborah Blum: From book to documentary film

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Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Deborah Blum’s five books have immersed her in the worlds of animal rights, the psychology of affection, the neurology of sex, the search for paranormal phenomena, and the chemistry of poisons. Her New York Times bestselling book The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, published in 2010, […]

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Christie Wilcox gets a taste of the Atlantic lionfish invasion

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The lionfish, a common aquarium fish native to the Indo-Pacific region, has become an invasive species in the Caribbean and southern U.S. Atlantic coast, where its voracious appetite for young grouper and snapper is endangering populations of these economically-important food fish. One proposed solution is to encourage people to harvest and eat lionfish. Christie Wilcox is a science writer and  Ph.D. […]

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Meredith Wadman probes the aftermath of a shooting

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On Friday, February 12, 2010, biologist Amy Bishop stood up in a conference room at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and shot six of her colleagues; three died. Nature correspondent Meredith Wadman visited the campus to recount the horror of those moments and efforts to rebuild a shattered department. [Life After Death appeared in […]

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Robin Marantz Henig explores the biology of anxiety

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New York Times Magazine contributing writer Robin Marantz Henig traveled to Harvard and the University of Maryland for a story on the biology of anxiety. Alongside top developmental psychologists, she watched research videos on infant temperament dating back to the 1970s and 1980s, then used the videos to set scenes that would bring to life […]

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Start the New Year right: Travel in time on an Antarctic adventure with Doug Fox

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In 2007, freelance science journalist Douglas Fox traveled to Antarctica with a team of glaciologists studying rivers and lakes buried under thousands of feet of ice. He and the researchers spent four weeks tent-camping on the ice. They spent up to 10 hours a day on snowmobiles, installing monitoring equipment at key sites on the […]

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Michelle Nijhuis searches for hopeful signs amid a bat plague

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You never know when a story idea will land on your doorstep—or in your mailbox. When award-winning journalist Michelle Nijhuis learned about caver and microbiologist Hazel Barton from a friend, she had no idea Barton would be her ticket into a science story she had been itching to tell, about a fungus that is ravaging […]

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Brendan Borrell jets to Bolivia for a hot story on chili peppers

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For his first major feature, freelancer Brendan Borrell crisscrossed Bolivia for 2 ½ weeks in an old truck with notebook, recorder, and camera, waiting out roadblocks, going a long time between meals, and of course munching hot chili peppers. [What’s So Hot About Chili Peppers? appeared in Smithsonian in April 2009.] [Editors' note: This interview […]

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Hillary Rosner makes readers care about an unassuming fish

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Freelancer Hillary Rosner traveled to a Colorado River reservoir to meet scientists bent on rescuing an unassuming fish, the razorback sucker. The resulting story, which won the 2010 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award in the Small Newspaper category, raised tough questions about the rationale for saving endangered species. [One Tough Sucker appeared in High Country […]

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David Grimm covers nuclear fallout, horse brains, mummified remains, and wine

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Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm profiles research using radioactive isotopes from atomic bomb fallout to pursue an astounding variety of scientific questions. His story for Science, which was included in The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2009, reveals how sticking with an elusive story can bring a big payoff. [The Mushroom Cloud’s Silver […]

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Susan Dominus delves into the lives and minds of a pair of conjoined twins

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New York Times Magazine staff writer Susan Dominus spent five days with the family of Tatiana and Krista Hogan, 4-year-old twins who are joined at the head. Observing Tatiana and Krista as they played, fought, ate, and slept, Dominus emerged with a gripping portrait of the girls’ everyday lives, revealing both their astonishing connection and […]

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