Posts Tagged ‘Carpenter’

Seth Mnookin Follows a Family Battling a Rare Genetic Disease  

Bertrand Might’s parents knew something was wrong soon after he was born in 2007. The baby was “jiggly” and nearly impossible to comfort; as he grew, his health deteriorated. For years, the Mights searched desperately for a diagnosis. In 2012, scientists at Duke University learned through a form of genetic analysis known as exome sequencing […]

Track changes: Making the Switch from Writer to Editor

Writers and editors don’t always see eye-to-eye. Sometimes those differences can make it feel like they simply don’t understand each other. But many editors come to their jobs after spending many years as writers, and they bring that experience with them when they take on their new roles. Last week, five writers-turned-editors participated in a […]

Ask TON: How Soon to Repitch the Same Editor?

Welcome back for another installment of Ask TON. (Click here to see previous installments.) Today’s question: I just received a nice rejection letter from an editor who encouraged me to try again. I’d really like to write for this publication. How soon is too soon to pitch another story?

Serendipity Stories: A New TON Series

A couple of months ago, science writer Jim Kling offered to share a story with TON readers about his unconventional path to a Science Careers story about a biologist who had learned to use her border collie not to herd sheep but to sniff out rare turtles as part of her field research. We were […]

George Johnson Chases Lightning

Some people fret over the chances that lightning might strike the same place twice. After three summers trailing lightning-chaser Tim Samaras on a unique photographic quest, science writer George Johnson would perhaps have been content with it happening just once. On assignment for National Geographic, Johnson patiently waited and watched as Samaras tried to capture a […]

Brian Vastag Profiles a Dinosaur Tracker

When Washington Post science writer Brian Vastag found Ray Stanford, an amateur dinosaur footprint tracker in the D.C. suburbs who had found an unusual baby dinosaur footprint, he thought he had stumbled upon a “nice little day story.” Soon, though, he realized that Stanford’s newest find was only the most recent chapter in a far […]

Jennifer Kahn Asks: Can a Child Psychopath Be Saved?

Of all mental disorders, none elicits more revulsion or less sympathy than psychopathy, a disorder characterized by extreme impulsivity, narcissism, callousness and lack of empathy. Psychopathy is widely considered incurable, but some researchers have theorized that it might be possible to treat “fledgling psychopaths” if they can be identified early enough. When journalist Jennifer Kahn […]

Greg Miller Examines Mental Health Care in Indonesia

For many people in the developing world who are mentally ill, psychiatric care is little more than a prison sentence. In one corner of Indonesia, that’s beginning to change, thanks in part to the 2004 earthquake and tsunami that devastated the region, providing a final impetus to develop a mental health system that had long […]

Helen Pearson Profiles an Activist Turned Scientist

A good profile of a scientist goes beyond the science itself—and that’s why Helen Pearson’s ears perked up when she learned the personal story of Joe Thornton, a University of Oregon evolutionary biologist whose first career was as a Greenpeace activist, fighting the release of toxic industrial chemicals. Pearson wanted to know what makes Thornton […]

Daniel Engber Dissects the Ubiquitous Laboratory Mouse

When Slate senior editor Daniel Engber took a month off from his usual duties to research a multi-part series on laboratory mice, he had a thesis—that although the ubiquity of mice as model organisms has clear advantages, it is in some ways damaging to biomedicine. What he needed was stories and characters to hang his […]

Lauren Gravitz Relates Nobel Laureate Steinman’s Poignant Story

For years, journalist Lauren Gravitz had planned to write an in-depth feature on Rockefeller University physician-scientist Ralph Steinman, highlighting the dendritic cells that had been his life’s work and his efforts to use those cells to treat his own cancer. Formerly a science writer at Rockefeller, Gravitz had spoken often with Steinman and knew his […]

Michelle Nijhuis Searches for Hopeful Signs amid a Bat Plague

You never know when a story idea will land on your doorstep—or in your mailbox. When award-winning journalist Michelle Nijhuis learned about caver and microbiologist Hazel Barton from a friend, she had no idea Barton would be her ticket into a science story she had been itching to tell, about a fungus that is ravaging […]

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