Posts Tagged ‘Edits’

Ask TON: How much editing to expect?

Welcome back for another installment of Ask TON. (Click here to see previous installments.) Today’s question: I’ve been a journalist for nearly a decade, but just recently went freelance. The first two stories I’ve had accepted, both about 1,500 words long, went through several rounds of editing over the course of several days. While I benefited from this […]

Cynthia Graber profiles a modern-day Dr. Frankenstein

While Cynthia Graber isn’t new to reporting on regenerative medicine, her interview with Tufts University biologist Michael Levin led to some unexpected stories. In research that recalls the toils of Dr. Frankenstein, Levin uses electricity to initiate regeneration of body parts in living organisms. In light of recent advances in DNA research, the field of […]

Brian Vastag profiles a dinosaur tracker

When Washington Post science writer Brian Vastag found Ray Stanford, an amateur dinosaur footprint tracker in the D.C. suburbs who had found an unusual baby dinosaur footprint, he thought he had stumbled upon a “nice little day story.” Soon, though, he realized that Stanford’s newest find was only the most recent chapter in a far […]

Ask TON: Are edits suggestions or demands?

Welcome back for another installment of Ask TON. (Click here to see previous installments.) Today’s question: I’m never sure if it’s OK to “just say no” to an editor’s edits. Do you view the edits more as decisions that have been made, or as strong suggestions that can be discussed or negotiated? And how late in the editing […]

Deborah Blum traces a poisonous history

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Deborah Blum’s five books have immersed her in the worlds of animal rights, the psychology of affection, the neurology of sex, the search for paranormal phenomena, and the chemistry of poisons. Her best-selling book The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, published in 2010, traces […]

Lauren Gravitz relates Nobel laureate Steinman’s poignant story

For years, journalist Lauren Gravitz had planned to write an in-depth feature on Rockefeller University physician-scientist Ralph Steinman, highlighting the dendritic cells that had been his life’s work and his efforts to use those cells to treat his own cancer. Formerly a science writer at Rockefeller, Gravitz had spoken often with Steinman and knew his […]

Michelle Nijhuis searches for hopeful signs amid a bat plague

You never know when a story idea will land on your doorstep — or in your mailbox. When award-winning journalist Michelle Nijhuis learned about caver and microbiologist Hazel Barton from a friend, she had no idea Barton would be her ticket into a science story she had been itching to tell, about a fungus that […]

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